Nora García, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, Spain Aníbal Bermúdez, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, Spain Tomás Daroca, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, Spain


Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze the results of minimum access surgery in comparison with conventional surgery, especially in relation to post-operative (PO) mortality. Materials and methods: This study was retrospective observational study, employing regressions, and bivariate correlations in the statistical analysis. A total of 114 patients over 65 years of age referred to cardiac surgery: 57 subjects in the minimum access group and 57 subjects in the sternotomy group. The main variables of interest were: demographic variables, PO course, mainly mortality, as well as duration of admission to critical care and total admission time. Results: The mean age was 73.11 years, with 52.6% of women and 47.4% of men, and no significant differences between the pre-operative characteristics of either group. Regarding mortality, this was lower in the minimum access group, statistically significant in the analysis using bivariate correlations. Conclusions: Aortic valve replacement using a minimally invasive approach is a safe technique in our environment, despite its necessary learning curve.



Keywords: Mortality. Minimum access surgery. Results. Conventional surgery.